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M Audio Delta card not working in OpenSUSE 12.3

Now I keep flipping between various Linux distributions. Recently I decided that I will run OpenSUSE 12.3 on my desktop and Ubuntu on my laptop. Now I have an old M Audio Delta 66 sound card, which I have ALWAYS had issues with (not only in Linux but Windows too from Vista upwards) and this was no different with OpenSUSE 12.3. There was no audio at all and I could not change any settings at all in System Settings > Sound (If I tried to load this up, it would crash).I ran lspci and could see the item was listed:

mike@Mike-Suse-PC:~> /sbin/lspci | grep -i audio
02:07.0 Multimedia audio controller: VIA Technologies Inc. ICE1712 [Envy24] PCI Multi-Channel I/O Controller (rev 02)
05:00.1 Audio device: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD] nee ATI RV770 HDMI Audio [Radeon HD 4850/4870]

Now I could see the sound card listed (Its the ICE1712 device) so I knew it was running at least. I’ve never been able to get this to work with pulse audio running so I removed this and installed alsa tools. To install this run the following:

sudo zypper install alsa-tools

After this has been installed I was able to edit the various inputs I use through the card (I use the Omni Studio expanded unit also). Now it depends on how you have yours set up, though I use the monitor outputs for my M Audio BX-8a speakers (my setup in Yast is listed below and as you can see I just use the DAC outputs, which are the monitor outputs on the soundcard). I also removed Pulseaudio as I no longer required this

OpenSUSE Volumes

I also removed pulse audio since I was no longer using it, however you can leave it installed if you really want (to uninstall just run sudo zypper remove pulseaudio). Now for MP3 support you will need to install the codecs for these as free and open source software is not allowed to package these together. There’s two ways to do this:

The Easy way

Simply click on this link and it will install all the relevant codecs you need for multimedia playback (MP3 and DVD etc)

The Terminal way

To install all the codecs you need you will first of all need to run the following commands in the terminal:

Add the needed repositories (skip the dvd repo if you don’t need DVD playback)

zypper addrepo -f http://ftp.gwdg.de/pub/linux/packman/suse/12.3/ packman
zypper addrepo -f http://opensuse-guide.org/repo/12.3/ dvd
Now this will add in the repositories needed to install all the items you need and keep them up to date also. The next command you need to run will command OpenSUSE to install the various codecs you need:
zypper install libxine2-codecs k3b-codecs ffmpeg lame gstreamer-0_10-plugins-bad gstreamer-0_10-plugins-ugly gstreamer-0_10-plugins-ugly-orig-addon gstreamer-0_10-plugins-ffmpeg libdvdcss2
Now once everything is installed and you have some glorious music playing out, I’d say it would be prime time to grab a fine ale and save yourself 1p 😉
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Time and Date missing from Ubuntu

I’ve been trying to use linux more and more as the command lines I know have always come in handy on some UNIX servers I’ve had to look after and macs also. So I am currently running OpenSUSE 12.2 on a laptop and Ubuntu 12.10 on my PC. I’m not sure how I did it, but while I was ripping bits of software out of Ubuntu, the time and date went missing from the top right hand corner of my display. I searched in Unity for Time and Date and alas it was not there.

Now since it was only the indicator that was missing, it was a simple case of re-installing the indicator again. To do this run the following command in the terminal

sudo apt-get install indicator-datetime

Now after you have installed this you have two options, either log out and then log back in again (bit too Microsoft-like for me) or you can kill off your unity program, which automatically restarts. To do this run the following command:

ps -ef | grep unity-panel-service

unity panel service

As you can see from the screenshot above, it will come back with the PID of the program (number next to the user) and the one you want to kill of is /usr/lib/unity/unity-panel-service. To kill this service off just run the command:

kill <PID you just discovered using ps -ef, which in my example above it 4643>

You will see unity close down, refresh and then the time will appear again in the top right hand corner. Now would be a perfect time (no matter what the time now says on your PC) to have a beer.